Furthering local historical knowledge

As Groundwork North Wales celebrates its  30th year we revisit an important project which we have delivered throughout the years.

The Celtic Heritage and Culture school programme helped further local historical knowledge through a hands-on, fun, and engaging day aimed at Primary age children.
 

This programme had been running since 1995 and was originally held at a 7.5-hectare site in Legacy, developed and funded as a community resource by the National Grid. At the site, a replica Celtic roundhouse was built and this helped the education team to tell the story of the Celts. At the same time, an Environmental Education Centre was also established. In total, during Legacy’s operation, 50,000 children benefited from education at the site.

In 2006, the Celtic Heritage and Culture programme and the Environmental Education centre relocated to the new Groundwork North Wales Woodland site at Tanyfron, Wrexham where a replica roundhouse was once again built to bring the story of the Celts to life.

While looking after our future is a key objective of Groundwork North Wales, remembering our past is also important. The  Celtic Heritage and Culture programme's aim was to teach children about the mighty Celts who lived in this area over two thousand years ago. Through the programme, children learn about the Celtic way of life, from building roundhouses to traditional crafts like weaving and pottery.

 The programme follows the story of a Celtic leader dressed in full costume, on their quest to find their lost chief and village. The children also become fully costumed Celts as they join in the activities of the day. The programme covers a variety of curriculum subjects and helps shine a light on an important part of our Welsh heritage.